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Technology Featured APAC

Only half of Gen Zs say they have control over personal data

Belgium – Selligent Marketing Cloud, the omnichannel marketing and customer experience platform, has released a report unpacking the critical issues brands need to address to effectively engage Generation Z (Gen Z) customers.

Gen Z (born between 1997 and 2010) is finally emerging in the consumer marketplace. Having grown up with more access to technology than any other generation before them, Gen Z sees technology as less of a ‘shiny’ object and more of an extension of modern life.

As such, Gen Z’s relationship to data is also different, and privacy isn’t much of a priority. In fact, the report reveals that only half of Gen Z respondents say they have control over their personal data.

This generation is also rewriting the rules when it comes to consumer engagement in areas like technology, shopping, media and brand loyalty. The report finds:

● 75% of Gen Z respondents say they shop on smartphones, compared to 69% of millennials

● 49% of Gen Z respondents say they obtain news and information from YouTube, compared to 37% of millennials

● 55% of Gen Z respondents want to wait until technology is proven to work before they adopt, compared to 47% of millennials

Going forward, it’s vital marketers forge a new toolkit aimed at reaching and engaging with Gen Z exclusively. By learning and understanding this generation’s motivations, behaviours and preferences, they can better create strategies that drive this significant consumer segment to action.

‘Phygital’ retail experiences matter to Gen Z

For retailers, having a presence across digital and physical channels is no longer enough to reach the youngest generation of consumers. Gen Z expects technology to enhance their physical experiences rather than replace them.

Interestingly, this age group shows a clear preference for in-store shopping over millennials in several categories, including electronics (43% vs. 37%) and clothing (43% vs. 40%). Gen Z also visits physical stores more often than any other age group: 59% visit a store at least once a week, the report reveals

Retailers, therefore, need to reinvent the shopping experience, merging the physical (brick-and-mortar) with the digital (online/web) in a way that appeals to Gen Z – a process newly coined as “phygital”. This term often goes hand in hand with “digitalisation at the point of sale” – the fusion between eCommerce and physical stores.

An educated, skeptical audience wants more from media

Rather than turning to traditional media brands, Gen Z is more likely to seek information on social-media platforms than older generations. In fact, almost half (49%) say they are more likely to make a purchase after seeing a post or ad on social media than through any other channel (SMS, website or email). When searching for information, Gen Z turns to influencers on platforms like TikTok (23% – twice as many as other generations) or YouTube (49% compared to 37% for millenials).

“This generation was raised with social media and can, therefore, adapt to various formats and types of content more easily. For this reason, companies have a unique opportunity to merge advertising and content strategies for this audience, as well as create and integrate different touchpoints with their consumers,” said Anne Jarry, marketing director for Europe and North America at Selligent.

“In a trusted environment, delivering highly relevant messages, such as personalised videos embedded in a newsletter or a live-streamed event on TikTok, is much more appealing to Gen Z than other generations. This generation requires an entirely new approach and opens up opportunities to brands that are worth capturing,” added Jarry. 

“The Gen Z transformation is upon us, and marketers must be ready. Those who haven’t evolved their marketing strategies to connect with this consumer segment are already falling behind. Gen Z’s behaviour and motivations are different from their predecessors. They consume information, interact online and even shop differently, therefore, it’s critical for marketers to adapt. As a generation that desires control, brands need to empower Gen Z to effectively capture their unique preferences and form relationships, especially as third-party cookies phase out entirely, making personalisation even more vital to reaching Gen Z,” said Ramses Bossuyt, global VP of client success at Selligent.

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Marketing Featured Southeast Asia

UnionBank holds SELYADO 4.0 event to help MSMEs boost customer privacy efforts

Philippines – In celebration of Privacy Awareness Week, Union Bank of the Philippines (UnionBank), in partnership with the Aboitiz Equity Ventures (AEV), recently held the fourth iteration of its annual privacy and security event ‘SELYADO’ as part of efforts to promote a culture of security and privacy consciousness among Filipino individuals and organisations.

Going with the theme “Safeguarding Data and Information of Individuals, Businesses, and Communities,” this year’s SELYADO focuses on engaging micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in relevant discussions that will help them protect their customers’ privacy and data, which is essential in today’s continuously growing digital economy.

The opening ceremony for the five-week event took place online last 18 May. The event will continue every Wednesday in the next four weeks with the following topics: ‘Data Proficiency for Beginners’ (25 May), ‘Cybersecurity for MSMEs’ (1 June), ‘Updates on DP Regulations and Data Privacy Trends’ (8 June), and ‘Empowering Your Business through Data Governance’ (15 June).

On the discourse of cybersecurity, UnionBank’s Chief Information Security Officer Joey Rufo, said, “We want to use SELYADO 4.0 to touch base with MSMEs to make them aware of how cybersecurity can be a strong value proposition for their business. How a trusted business can enable growth as consumers will only transact with organisations they can trust with their information and money.” 

“As we celebrate Privacy Awareness Week together with the National Privacy Commission, we envision inclusive digital transformation and innovation in aiding MSMEs to cater to the data and information needs of their growing sector—inclusive, because we want to empower them to know how they can protect their data and that of their customers,” said UnionBank’s Data Protection Officer and Head of Artificial Intelligence and Data Policy, Atty. Sasa Montes.

“Together with the Data Privacy Group and the Cybersecurity Team, we bring SELYADO 4.0 with the cybersecurity specialisations that we are very proud of in UnionBank,” said UnionBank’s SME and Micropreneurs Head Jaypee Soliman. 

According to Soliman, their partners are also present in the event to bring their knowledge, expertise, and even their technologies to the MSMEs. “These partnerships are very critical, because this fight cannot be handled by one, it cannot be handled by a few, it has to be all of us together learning, understanding, implementing, and even advocating for our security,” added Soliman.

UnionBank’s Head of Blockchain and API Business Group Cathy Casas was one of the speakers during the event, where she talked about the Metaverse and how the emerging idea of a fully immersive virtual world is changing how organisations think.

“We feel that from the Metaverse, especially as blockchain is embedded here, at least the concept of it, it’s not just important now but it will continue to grow in importance in the coming years,” Casas said.

Atty. Darwin Angeles, also one of the event’s speakers, talked about the importance of developing an intellectual property (IP) strategy and touched on how cybersecurity can help protect a business’ IP, which is typically what sets one apart from the competition. 

“Security infrastructure is very important because we want to protect something that’s important to us, and for a business, intellectual property, or our brand identity that gives us competitive edge, can be that crown jewel for our business for which we want to seek protection for,” Angeles said.

The third speaker, NPC Deputy Privacy Commissioner Atty. Dug Christopher Mah, did a presentation on accountable personal data management for MSMEs, which reiterated that MSMEs must strictly follow the rules set by the commission in order to ensure the privacy and security of customers.

“Data privacy and data security must be part of the core organisation and a strategic concentration for all businesses to safeguard the privacy rights of their customers, especially their data subjects,” Mah said.

In the closing remarks, Dr. David Hardoon, said, “We’re doing this to make sure that security, governance, privacy are a hygiene, and I used the word ‘hygiene’ in its utmost positive and developmental sense, that it is something that facilitates us to develop, to innovate, and build solutions that benefit us, both within the organisation, and of course our consumers.” 

According to Dr. Hardoon, this initiative is ultimately about making sure that privacy is a driver for business development, a driver for innovation, a driver for possibilities.

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Main Feature Marketing Partners APAC

MARKETECH APAC webinar discusses how loyalty strategies will drive greater returns in cookie-less world

Singapore – Last April 28, MARKETECH APAC, in partnership with Oracle, gathered marketing leaders from the Southeast Asia region in the webinar, ‘The Future of Marketing: Loyalty-led strategies in a cookie-less world’, to discuss and uncover how loyalty-led strategies can help brands thrive in digital advertising amidst the elimination of third-party cookies. 

Lisa Collins, director of strategy, Oracle Customer Experience, through a keynote presentation, shared how web 3.0 will transform the way consumers interact and engage with brands and the implications on data collection in this new world. She further explained how loyalty marketing seamlessly fits into the picture as a viable alternative to obtaining quality data sans third-party cookies. 

Collins shared how the present evolution in digital advertising presents opportunities for loyalty programs to be transformed as a key to achieving healthy data exchange. Where loyalty only used to mean rewards and points at best, Collins shared the different innovative ways that brands can deliver them now amidst the increasing popularity of NFTs and cryptocurrency.

Meanwhile, the topic was further delved into with a panel discussion that was participated by marketing heads from Malaysia and the Philippines. Together with Collins; Norsiah Juriani Johari, vice president for product marketing at Astro Malaysia, and Anvey Factora, head of marketing communications, e-commerce and retail at Canon Philippines, shared their expert views and insights into implementing first-party data strategies and data’s role in developing loyalty marketing for the future.

Each of the panellists also highlighted the trends they believe will have the biggest impact on performance and loyalty marketing in 2-3 years, resulting in an insightful discussion about NFTs, ‘revenge’ travel, and the ‘revolution’ of e-commerce. 

The webinar drew 153 marketing professionals from a variety of industries, including retail and e-commerce, media and entertainment and CPG. Most attendees hailed from the markets of the Philippines, Singapore and Malaysia, and those who took part were from companies Bosch, Estee Lauder, Hmlet, Loob Holding, Mastercard, Sanofi, Sunway Malls, The Ascott Limited, True Digital Group, and Xendit. 

On the webinar, Collins commented, “Providing delightful contextual customer journeys [is] critical to customer acquisition, retention and loyalty. As marketers, we’ve always relied on a rich array of data signals to inform these journeys. However, with the imminent demise of third party cookies, a key ingredient for consistent personalised targeting hangs in the balance.”

“But let’s take a step back to understand the root cause of this issue: Consumers are fed up with giving over their personal and behavioural data with their only reward being more personalised advertising. This was arguably what led to a raft of privacy changes and also why the web3 ethos is resonating so strongly: people want to feel meaningfully rewarded for consuming content, for engagement, and for their own creative contribution,” Collins added. 

Meanwhile, Shaina Teope, regional editor of MARKETECH APAC, and also moderator of the panel, remarked, “With the rapid changes in digital, we made sure that with this webinar, we covered good ground on such developments, so it’s not just about discussing cookies, but how these privacy changes will affect brands as we enter a more decentralised internet.” 

“With the combined presence of our marketing leaders, we were able to get into what the future looks like in digital advertising, web 3.0, and loyalty marketing. We’re confident that with this discussion, we’ve become more ready to sail uncharted waters,” added Teope. 

On-demand access to the webinar is now available. Get your access HERE.

Categories
Marketing Featured APAC

Five ways marketers can satisfy their ‘sweet tooth’ in a cookie-less world

Nobody can deny that the pace and degree of digital transformation is accelerating in the wake of the pandemic, creating mounting pressure to meet customers wherever they are. Those who were once never online are now navigating the digital world with a new sense of confidence.

This new world has also brought its fair share of challenges as well. Consumers, for one, are increasingly skeptical when it comes to their privacy and the privacy of their data, in particular. Their expectations of brands are also changing. They want more personalised and relevant experiences. Essentially, if they provide their data, then they expect to benefit from an enhanced experience.

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak at the Digital Leadership Forum (DLF), conducted in partnership with BPP, where we discussed the above digital customer trends in the APAC region. From what today’s consumers want to privacy, cookies and more, this is the information all marketers need as they tiptoe into a future without third-party cookies.

The privacy paradox

Thanks to digital acceleration, consumers are becoming increasingly careful, informed, sophisticated, and demanding in their shopping interactions. At the same time, they’re also far less tolerant of sub-standard shopping experiences, both online and in-store.

Their digital expectations have also risen exponentially, causing brands everywhere to face their biggest challenge yet — balancing customers’ desires for personalised interactions while fiercely protecting customer privacy.

It’s what we’re calling the privacy paradox. Consumers are really skeptical about how brands are using their data. Facebook has only added fuel to the fire with the controversy surrounding it in recent years. At Cheetah Digital, we’re finding more and more consumer sentiment around social channels becoming negative.

In Australia, our 2022 Digital Consumer Trends Index revealed that 63% of consumers do not trust these platforms with their data. Now, of course, that doesn’t mean they’re not using these platforms. They’re just treating them with a healthy dose of skepticism.

For example, when asked, a whopping 86% of consumers said they wanted to see brands spend more on their loyalty offering and less on Facebook advertising. Interestingly, there has also been a large positive sentiment for brands that have pulled ads from Facebook altogether because of concerns about the rise of harmful content. Consumers know the value of their data, as a result, they’re being increasingly protective of it.

When I think of a really tremendous example of digital transformation and acceleration, I think of our customer Purebaby. In a very short period of time, the Australian company underwent an incredible transformation.

Previously, Purebaby relied heavily on brick-and-mortar stores to drive revenue. Its online offering was just a secondary thought. That is until COVID-19 came to be. When it hit, Purebaby rapidly and successfully pivoted, resulting in roughly 90% of its revenue coming in from online sales. It has completely changed the brand’s business and business model forever.

The great thing about this transformation success story is that to bolster its online experience, Purebaby shifted from focusing on purely promotional marketing to building up robust lifecycle programs. To give you some context, Purebaby set up 22 email programs within the space of just 18 months. 

The brand did this to ensure the online experience was seamless for its new demanding digital customers. Purebaby provided different touchpoints that were more triggered and personal than ever before. So when you look at how digital acceleration is changing the way consumers engage, it essentially comes down to the fact that they’re becoming more careful, and therefore, require brands to earn their trust.

Beefed up GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation)

Life is about to change big time for APAC marketers. As we all know, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a regulation in EU law on data protection and privacy. The model is being adopted for the APAC region as well, leading to the death of the cookie.

This means brands and companies are at risk of facing regulatory penalties and lawsuits if they don’t adhere to the new privacy requirements. Even more, companies can no longer assume that if they cannot identify someone through an IP address that the law won’t apply to them. Because it will. As marketers, we need to be more cautious than ever in our approach to treating unknown users.

The question is, are we ready for this change? According to Forrester, probably not. Its research revealed that 43% of marketers say their current practices rely on third-party cookies. Even more, 59% of marketers in APAC say they only fulfil the minimum requirements to comply with data privacy regulations. That means there is a large portion of people who still don’t feel like they’re meeting minimum requirements.

With customers’ demands going beyond those minimum requirements, how can we make sure that we meet them in a place that keeps them happy and comfortable? Apple CEO Tim Cook said it best — “Technology does not need vast troves of personal data, stitched together across dozens of websites and apps in order to succeed. Advertising existed and thrived for decades without it.”

He continues, “If a business is built on misleading users, on data exploitation, on choices that are no choices at all; it does not deserve our praise. It deserves reform.” Case in point: Business owners and marketers cannot get away with what they’ve done in the past anymore.

Look at Apple’s mail privacy protection functionality that came into play in September last year. The update essentially allows users to turn off their opening tracking, hide IP addresses, and in some cases, hide email addresses. So it’s a lot more difficult to judge how a consumer is interacting with the communication you’ve sent them. This is some of the “fun” that we as marketers have to accept in this new cookie-less world.

As the cookie crumbles

We’ve been discussing the death of the cookie for a long time. Google announced plans to entirely phase out third-party cookies within two years. And although Google’s privacy pivot is a win for privacy-conscious consumers; it’s a headache for marketers and businesses who rely on these third-party cookies to advertise effectively. Next year will be here before we know it; so we need to be ready. We need to find a new way to satisfy our “sweet tooth” because the cookie is truly crumbling.

At Cheetah Digital, our goal is to always get brands to focus on building out a zero-party data strategy. And the reason is simple: this preference data comes directly from the consumer so there are no intermediaries — no guesswork. They’re telling you exactly what their preference is. It’s psychographic data that includes your customers’ values, attitudes, interests, and personality traits.

The only thing to be cognizant of is this will change over time. Unlike first-party data like first and last names and mobile numbers, which remain pretty static, zero-party data relating to attitudes and life stages continually evolves. So you have to keep understanding and collecting.

Cosying up with consumer expectations

We’ve established that consumers have the expectation for brands to know them. But what they’re comfortable with is a different story. Our research shows that most people actually want a consistent experience regardless of whether they interact online or in-store.

Consumers want messages that recognise their shopping history. They want their data to be used in ways that make them feel comfortable and like an individual. So don’t send them irrelevant content or offers based on information they haven’t directly shared with you — that’s considered creepy.

At the end of the day, it’s essentially a value exchange. Our research reveals that 55% of consumers are comfortable with sharing data with brands in exchange for better service. So if you want to know more about the consumer, figure out what you can give them in return for that information. At Cheetah Digital, we find that consumers respond positively to discounts, coupons, loyalty points, and rewards.

Use those aspects to gain additional insight into your consumer, understand your audience better, and then target them, using the data in a way that they find relevant and useful. Also understand that consumers have high expectations for brands. All it takes is one misstep or one bad experience for them to go elsewhere because, with today’s bustling online world, they have more options than ever before right at their fingertips.

For marketers who are struggling to meet the needs of consumers and their various demands, it’s time to update their toolkits to include new strategies and tactics to thrive. They need to market to an individual with authenticity, relevance, and accuracy and that requires an entirely new way of thinking.

Take a look below for five ways to thrive in a world with no third-party cookies.

5 ways to survive a cookie-less future:

1. Stop renting data: Build your own databases through direct-consumer relationships. Have a robust data-collection strategy to support this. And know that the data you need to market to individuals with the right level of relevance and privacy doesn’t come easily. It requires a strategy that incentivises consumers to tell you about themselves willingly, with the permission to use that data.

2. “Know them and show them”: Consumers expect digital interactions that are immediate and highly relevant to them. They have real-time expectations and think you should “know them and show them” how well you understand them. This requires a single view of the customer with preferences and insights that can be used for decisioning in the moment to drive engaging experiences anywhere your customer interacts with you.

3. Devise a loyalty initiative: Not every brand needs a loyalty program. But every brand does have to provide some sort of value exchange. Well-executed interactions across channels help customers feel a connection, and that connection leads to them reciprocating with purchases and eventually, loyalty to your brand.

4. Know the rules of engagement: Consumers expect to engage with you on different devices. In fact, today’s consumers use an average of nearly six touchpoints, with half of them regularly using more than four when engaging with a brand.

5. Create a craving: When customers want to participate in your loyalty program, you need to do more than incentivise transactions. You want to reward them for behaviours as well. Loyalty program management is vital to keep customers coming back for more.

Don’t take my word for it. Market research by Twilio’s Segment reveals that 44% of consumers will likely become repeat buyers and 32% will likely leave a positive review after a personalised shopping experience. There is life after the death of the cookie, and if you’re prepared, it has the potential to be even sweeter.

And talking about a ‘sweet’ success story – check out how Bakers Delight increased its basket size by more than 20% when its ‘Dough Getters’ loyalty program launched in the first half of 2021.

The key takeaway is, when you know individuals and can market to them with personalised experiences that they welcome — not because you snooped on them — magical things happen. 

This article was written by Alexandra Smit, digital marketing & automation specialist at Cheetah Digital. Cheetah Digital is a cross-channel customer engagement solution provider that enables marketers to create personalised experiences, cross-channel messaging, and loyalty strategies.

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Main Feature Marketing APAC

MARKETECH APAC to explore how loyalty marketing can be key to a cookie-less world in upcoming webinar

Singapore – Ever since tech juggernauts such as Google and Apple have announced that they are putting down an iron fist on privacy, the world of digital advertising has been shaken with brands and marketers suddenly thrust to the challenge of uncompromised campaigns even with the absence of what have been their cornerstone – third-party cookies. 

Due to this looming challenge, conversations around viable solutions spurred, but the industry, looking ahead to being crippled by an end of an era, would need more definitive answers to break down the perplexity of a cookie-less world.

This is why MARKETECH APAC, the digital media for the marketing and advertising industry in APAC, in partnership with Oracle, is taking the wheel to steer the discussion into what presents to be a top effective strategy for this dilemma – loyalty marketing. Happening on April 28, 2022, the webinar ‘The Future of Marketing: Loyalty-led strategies in a cookie-less world’, aims to unravel the practicability and sensibility of loyalty-focused solutions on keeping the quality of brands’ marketing intact amid a more privacy-driven digital landscape. 

We have gathered marketing leaders in the region from the industries of media, imaging, and technology, to help shine light on how loyalty, put at the heart of our marketing arsenal, can help us thrive in this entirely new environment. 

Joining the industry discussion are Norsiah Juriani Johari, the vice president of product marketing at Astro Malaysia; Anvey Factora, the head of marketing communications, e-commerce and retail of Canon Philippines; and Lisa Collins, the director of customer experience strategy at Oracle

Each of them will be sharing their expert views on why loyalty is never dead, and why it matters in a cookie-less world as well as the personalisation strategies that work best to boost brand loyalty in Southeast Asia markets. Furthermore, they will also be discussing the role of data in creating future-ready loyalty marketing. 

Shaina Teope, the regional editor of MARKETECH APAC, commented, “I believe that as we put an end to what has been a fixture in our marketing gameplans, we are called to be overprepared and be more than ready for such tricky independence. This is the worthy price to pay for a much safer digital landscape, and we’re here to show you how loyalty marketing can warrant an answer.” 

The webinar, ‘The Future of Marketing: Loyalty-led strategies in a cookie-less world’, will be held on April 28, 2022, 2:30 pm SGT. Secure your spot at the webinar HERE.

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Marketing Featured Global

Cheetah Digital unveils key trends on relationship marketing–from loyalty to messaging

Australia – Global cross-channel relationship management solution provider Cheetah Digital has recently launched its consumer trends index this year, which unveiled the latest key trends regarding relationship marketing, ranging from privacy trends to loyalty and messaging.

In regards to privacy trends, the index has noted huge rises in those turning to incognito browsing, amounting to a 50% increase, a 48% increase for using a PC cleaner software, a 40% increase in using a password generator, a 37% increase in usage of ad blocking tech, a 31% increase in those paying for premium software, and a 31% increase in usage of a password manager.

Staying on the topic of privacy, the index also noted that users prefer brands to only use data that they have explicitly shared directly to the brand. Other methods such as ads based on location data, retargeting ads derived from tracking cookies, and ads related to something they discussed near a smart device ‘creep’ out users.

Meanwhile, in regards to brand loyalty, around 57% of consumers say they are prepared to pay more to buy from a preferred brand, with loyalty metrics spiking across the board. Among the growing reasons they stay loyal are when brands understand customers as individuals (110% increase), treat their data with respect (71% increase), align with their personal values (58% increase) and offer admirable loyalty programs (55% increase).

Furthermore, consumers’ expectations of the loyalty programs are maturing, with a desire for contests and sweepstakes, increasing to around 73%. Other loyalty initiatives that customers expect include exclusive access and content (58% increase), and personalised product recommendations (56% increase).

Lastly, when it comes to messaging marketing to customers, email remains one of the most effective channels, beating banner ads, social media ads, organic posts, and SMS by up to 108%. Half of consumers report purchasing a product directly as a result of an email they received in the last 12 months. 

Speaking about the index release, Tim Glomb, VP of content at Cheetah Digital, said, “The path to customer acquisition has evolved from a relatively straightforward train track to a bowl of spaghetti, with multiple channels and formats to navigate. Brands can no longer get away with lumping customers into segments, but rather must treat them as individuals. This requires developing authentic relationships, offering real value exchange, and interpreting the right customer signals at the right time in the right channel.”

He added, “This report offers brands an extraordinary opportunity to assess their ability to create and execute campaigns that meet and exceed consumers’ growing demand for more personalisation, more privacy and a deeper relationship with the brands they know and trust.”

Cheetah Digital’s index is available for download here.

Categories
Technology Featured Southeast Asia

Two-thirds of SG marketers expect about 25% drop in revenues over loss of third-party cookies

Singapore – While a privacy-first internet is the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, advertisers and companies are not withheld from disclosing the real pains of transitioning and adapting to a cookieless digital space when Google dropped the news of cookie deprecation in 2020. 

Advertisers were, however, granted a breather, when the cookies phase-out, originally eyed by the tech giant in 2022 had been delayed a bit further into 2022.

Shortly after the announcement, data solutions provider Lotame released a poll among 200 Singapore-based senior decision-makers in digital media and marketing to further learn their sentiments on the future of cookieless internet. 

First off, half, or 55%, said they were happy with Google’s decision to delay citing that they needed “more time to prepare.” 

A top concern among digital media professionals is losing revenue amid weakened ad-targeting opportunities, where about 57% of marketers believe in reduced ad-targeting opportunities, with over two-thirds (66%) expecting a 10% to 25% drop in revenues as a result of the loss of third-party cookies. Meanwhile, almost 60% (57%) of publishers anticipate a reduction in the workforce brought by revenue loss. 

In adopting new identity solutions, the primary reason for Singapore-based marketers is to support audience targeting (59%), while among publishers, 64% would foremost adopt identity solutions for data privacy. 

With the optimal number of ID solutions, 36% of Singapore marketers were open to using any number, while 35% of publishers cited two, with 30% saying three.

“A cookieless future is closer on the horizon and whether or not the industry ‘feels prepared,’ the end result is inevitable,” said Luke Dickens, Lotame’s managing director for ANZ.

Dickens adds, “Digital advertising is changing, and identity solutions will be part of that new future. Addressability and connectivity are at greatest threat in the post-cookie world.”

With a stronger call for privacy, Apple, aside from Google, had digital media players also rethinking their ad strategies with an update on its privacy features earlier this year.

Apple’s new iCloud Private Relay has been designed to protect users’ privacy by ensuring that when browsing the web in Safari, no single party, including Apple itself, can see a user’s identity and the sites he or she is visiting.

The same survey found that 53% of Singapore-based respondents are concerned about their ability to monetize the email channel amid Apple’s new privacy feature, while 46% said they are concerned for the impact on email hash identifiers.

Relatedly, email-based identity solutions (69%) were the most popular choice when asked what types of ID solutions marketers and publishers were planning to test in the next six months to one year. Contextual (44%) was in second place, followed by cohorts (33%) and probabilistic (27%).

The current report ‘Beyond the Cookie: Identity Solution Adoption & Testing Among Marketers and Publishers’ is part two of Lotame’s cookie-focused study, where the pilot study was released in February and examined how organizations are beginning to plan for the phase-out of third-party cookies.

Categories
Technology Featured Global

Blis’ latest campaign emphasizes the metaphor of an impending ‘data drought’

London, United Kingdom – With the eventual ‘death’ of third-party data in favor of privacy-centric advertising strategies, global location-based programmatic advertising company Blis puts focus on this dilemma businesses in the future may face by launching a global campaign that likens this ‘data drought’ to an actual drought in real life.

The campaign, which features Blis’ CEO Gregor Isbister, demonstrates the metaphor of being alone in the desert during a drought is aligned with the fact that businesses should migrate as soon as possible with advertising strategies with privacy at its core, unless they wait to be affected by the changes on data-centric advertising.

Furthermore, Blis demonstrates that businesses can ‘escape’ this ‘drought’ by implying privacy-centric ad strategies, including their commercial message of location-powered behavioral data that can provide marketers and media planners with real-world behavior data.

Other messages include location data that can help brands understand the real purchase journey and through an interactive and visual tool that combines data from the company’s global panel with precise location data and anonymized rich third-party signals, discovering and activating audiences is quick and easy.

“The scarcity of data in the post-cookie world does not remove the ability to engage and connect with your digital audience. Brands can still reach their online prospects at scale via privacy-compliant personalized advertising. Even though at Blis we work in the B2B space, we are still marketing to people, and especially during this exceptional time in history, we want to engage our audiences and leave them with a positive and memorable impression, by speaking to them not as robots, but as actual real humans with needs and wants,” Ed Burleigh, head of marketing for Asia at Blis shared to MARKETECH APAC.

When asked why they used the metaphor of a drought in the desert to represent the campaign, Burleigh stated that the desert is an ‘extreme metaphor’ for what may happen when cookies disappear entirely from the digital advertising ecosystem, adding also the new landscape where Apple’s ID for Advertisers (IDFA) update eliminates ad tracking.

“In the desert, there are limited options to survive. However, Blis believes by applying the power of location data, and a myriad of rich and anonymized data signals, brands can reach the right people at the right time. We know that marketers are concerned about the removal of the Chrome cookie. However, we believe a data drought can be avoided,” he stated.

Burleigh added, “We’ve done this by addressing a key industry issue – that is facing all of us – with a sense of clever playfulness. One way we’ve achieved this is by putting a face on the brand, which is a great way to humanize it. Our new company video features our CEO Greg as the lead ‘character’ on a personal journey to beat the data drought. It’s authentic, believable, and fun.”

Categories
Technology Featured South Asia

‘Who Ate My Cookie?’: Dentsu Data Sciences releases industry paper on privacy-centric world

New Delhi, India – The Indian arm of dentsu’s data services agency Dentsu Data Sciences has recently published a new industry position paper on the importance of privacy to marketers, publishers, consumers, and data brokers as they face both challenges and opportunities in maintaining their position in a privacy-first world.

Titled ‘Who Ate My Cookie’, the paper notes on the importance of computer ‘cookies’ having been for a long time the cornerstone of digital marketing ever since their inception in 1994. They have been the basis of digital advertising, with a goal to deliver more relevant ads to consumers, companies have amassed troves of customer data via third-party cookies, which eroded customer trust. 

This industry position paper aims to describe the shift and need toward a privacy-first world by demystifying ecosystem changes and attempts to provide guidance to marketers and publishers on navigating a “privacy-first” online world devoid of third-party cookies.

For Gautam Mehra, chief data and product strategy officer for Asia Pacific and CEO at dentsu Programmatic, the paper speaks by a matter of fact that “the digital revolution that [has] created so many new business and marketing opportunities is now driving the customer revolution.”

“Developing strong customer relationships has always been fundamental to building a successful business practice. This becomes more vital in a privacy-first world. Through our position paper, we endeavor to assist the industry in navigating through the fast paced ecosystem changes and provide guidance on a few possible solutions to strengthen customer experiences with privacy at its core,” Mehra stated.

Meanwhile, Nishant Malsisaria, vice president of product strategy for Asia Pacific at dentsu Data Sciences, commented that in order for organizations to succeed in a new customer-driven environment, organizations must be able to use consent-based information, technology, and analytics to deliver relevant customer experiences across channels.

“A privacy-first world promotes the need to develop first-party data sets in a far more secure and privacy-focused way. Future competitive advantage will depend on the ability of brands to have more control over their audiences in a trust-based world,” Malsisaria added.

The paper is written under the specialist consumer insights wing dentsu Marketing Cloud (DMC) Insights, which offers an expertise-led model to assist dentsu Data Sciences’ research and insights, consulting and practice teams in delivering differentiated values to their clients. A copy of the paper can be obtained through dentsu marketing’s site.

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SaaS analytics platform AppsFlyer launches new predictive analytics feature

Singapore – Global SaaS analytics platform AppsFlyer has announced the launch of its new predictive analytics feature, PredictSK, a new solution that will be a part of its SKAdNetwork suite, SK360

SKAdNetwork is about to become a major part of campaign measurement and optimization on iOS, following Apple’s latest privacy changes. This deterministic attribution framework provides advertisers with some data on their iOS campaigns, and while Apple has been continuously making updates to improve its offering to advertisers and app developers, it also introduces critical limitations.

Through the new solutions suite, brands are able to configure and optimize their conversion value, validate their data and keep it fraud-free. They will also be able to integrate with their choice of partners, all through a dedicated, centralized analytics dashboard. 

PredictSK is made in response to the current limitation of SKAdNetwork where advertisers rely on short window time in measuring campaign performance. With only 24 hours of user activity to work with, optimization is nearly impossible. With PredictSK, advertisers will be able to leverage early signals of engagement, which is usually in the first 24-72 hours, to predict long-term campaign performance. 

Furthermore, PredictSK puts mobile attribution in SKAdNetwork on ‘auto-pilot’, removing the measurement and timing barriers and allowing advertisers to maintain and strengthen their competitive edge in this new reality.

According to Barak Witowski, vice president for core product at AppsFlyer, the company’s developed solutions have always been at best for the benefit of advertisers, adding that PredictSK will help brands be empowered against limited data availability.

“AppsFlyer’s SK360 suite will empower brands to eliminate the uncertainty brought on by limited data availability and limited measurement capabilities, while maintaining end user privacy, by combining multiple solutions for maximum coverage,” Witowski stated.

He added, “Moreover, PredictSK will enable measurement across all user events to quickly and accurately predict user loan-to-value (LTV), helping advertisers save precious time and money. With SK360, Advertisers can stay in the driver’s seat while complying with the strictest privacy requirements,”

Meanwhile, Liwei Chen, staff product manager at Twitter, stated that they were working closely with AppsFlyer in delivering a fully operational plug-and-play SKAdNetwork solution.

“The solution was designed together to validate all advertisers’ needs from SKAdNetwork are met: data trust, granularity, optimization, and measurement. This is another exciting step for advertisers, delivering upon our promise of helping drive business success while maximizing end-user privacy,” said Chen.

The new product will be available after Apple starts enforcing its AppTrackingTransparency framework in early spring. The SK360 suite will continue to support the ecosystem throughout Apple’s upcoming privacy updates.